Dear Readers,

In this post I would like to show you step by step how to make your own liquid fertilizers by using herbs such as comfrey, manure and my favorite: Gardener’s Revenge Fertilizer from weeds.

Making your own liquid fertilizers is incredibly easy, super thrifty but rather smelly so try to make them somewhere downwind of the garden.

Liquid fertilizers can be bought at the local garden supply store and JimJim favors the convenience of these ready to go products.  I on the other hand, quite enjoy making these and seeing the effects of them on the plants.

Try to use a container were toy can cover it over to reduce the riskof mosquitoes laying eggs and their larvae thriving in the stagnant water.

Gardener’s Revenge Liquid Fertilizer

I think this is the easiest liquid fertilizer to make since it only requires a bucket, some water and some weeds.

Perennial weeds should not be placed into the compost heap unless you know that you will get the heap to heat up enough to kill the weed and any seeds.  You can however, drown the weeds then place them in the compost heap so nothing is wasted.

In a 10 quart bucket, fill with at least 1/2  with weeds.  Chop them up a bit for faster decomposition then cover with water.  Rainwater is ideal but tap water should be fine; there is some debate about using tap water and if you do, allow the chlorine to dissipate 24 hours before using.

make your own liquid fertilizer

Some gardeners advise covering with a lid to speed up the decomposition and to reduce the smell.  I don’t currently have a lid or cover to use as a lid so I leave the bucket uncovered.

After 2-4 weeks, the weeds should be sludgy and when the water is disturbed, a pungent smell released.

How to make liquid fertilizer

The water should be drained off into bottles or containers and labelled with the contents.

To use, dilute around 1/4 cup in 2 gallon watering can for general watering.  If using as a foliar feed, reduce the quantity to around 2 table spoons to a gallon of water to avoid leaf-burn.

The sludgy weeds can now be placed on the compost pile.

Seaweed Liquid Fertilizer

Another easy fertilizer to make.  You will need some fresh seaweed, a bucket and some water.

Wash the salt off the seaweed by thoroughly rinsing with plenty of water then place in the bucket and top up with water and cover.  You will want as much seaweed as the bucket can hold and equal amounts of water.

Leave for at least 8 weeks for the seaweed to start rotting down, stir the concoction every few days.  The longer you leave the seaweed in the water, the better it is.

Drain off the liquid into bottles or containers and label them.  The seaweed makes a wonderful addition to the compost pile or can be used as a mulch for plants.

To use, dilute around 1/4 cup in 2 gallon watering can for general watering.  If using as a foliar feed, reduce the quantity to around 2 table spoons to a gallon of water to avoid leaf-burn.

You could also use dried seaweed meal if you live in a landlocked location.  Seaweed meals do vary so you should experiment with the amount of seaweed meal to water, I would start at 2-3 cups in a 10 quart bucket.

Herby Liquid Fertilizer

Don’t be mistaken that this one will smell any better than the others, it doesn’t!

Like Gardener’s Revenge, simply place 1/2 bucket of chopped herbs into a bucket and cover with water.  Cover with a lid and leave 2-4 weeks.

Any culinary herb can be used and some of the medicinal ones.  Avoid using anything which is poisonous.  Some of the best herbs to use as a liquid fertilizer includes strawberry leaves, mint, dandelion, chamomile, yarrow and nettles.  You can use a mixture of herbs or stick with a single variety.

The water should be drained off into bottles or containers and labelled with the contents, particularly if you used a mixture of herbs.

To use, dilute around 1/4 cup in 2 gallon watering can for general watering.  If using as a foliar feed, reduce the quantity to around 2 table spoons to a gallon of water to avoid leaf-burn.

Comfrey Liquid Fertilizer

Comfrey liquid fertilizer is a slightly different process than the other liquid fertilizers.

To make, you will need a container punctured with a hole (or several holes if placing a bucket within a bucket).  If using a bucket with a single hole, place up on a couple of cinder (breeze) blocks and place a watering can or container below to catch the liquid which will drain out.

Fill the bucket with comfrey leaves then weigh down with bricks.  As the leaves decompose, a brown liquid will drip out into the container below.  Store the liquid in a cool dark place and don’t bottle and tighten the lids; the liquid ferments in warmer weather.

To use, dilute 1 part comfrey fertilizer to 15 parts water.

Manure Liquid Fertilizer

Take a mesh or net bag and place in it some dung one piece of horse manure is enough for 10 gallons of water.  Let the manure steep in the water, use a wire clothes hanger to hook the bag onto the side of the container.

After 4-8 weeks, the manure can be added to the compost heap once the water has been strained into containers or bottles.

Horse, sheep, goat, donkey, chicken and duck manure can all be used in this way.  Don’t use dog or cat manure as this can harbor diseases and pathogens which can be passed to humans.  You can also use compost in the same way if you don’t have access to manure.